Tag Archives: members

See You at the New York State Fair

The Great New York State Fair opens today in Syracuse and NYSLRS is there.

The 13-day celebration of everything New York runs through Monday, September 2 (Labor Day). Our information representatives will be at the fairgrounds, as they have been for more than 20 years, to help members and retirees with their retirement planning and benefit questions. In the past, many NYSLRS members have stopped by the booth to get a benefit projection. You’ll also be able to pick up retirement plan brochures and forms or have a brief consultation with one of our information representatives.

The NYSLRS booth will be in the Center of Progress Building, building 6 on the State Fair map, near the Main Gate.

Find Unclaimed Funds at the State Fair

OSC’s Office of Unclaimed Funds booth will be in the same building. An unclaimed fund is lost or forgotten money, perhaps in old bank account or insurance policy, that has been turned over to the State. See if any of that money is yours. So far this year, State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli and the Office of Unclaimed Funds has returned more than $243 million.

New York State Fair

 

Special State Fair Days

Friday, August 23

  • Pride Day – Performances and LGBTQ participation in daily parade

Monday, August 26

  • Law Enforcement Day — Free admission for active and retired law enforcement personnel and corrections officers
  • Senior Citizens’ Day — Free admission for senior citizens (60+)

Tuesday, August 27

  • Comptroller DiNapoli Visits the Fair — He manages the New York State Common Retirement Fund and is the administrator of NYSLRS. He’ll be stopping by the NYSLRS booth during the day.
  • Fire & Rescue Day — Free admission for active and retired members of fire departments and emergency services organizations
  • Senior Citizens’ Day — Free admission for senior citizens (60+)

Wednesday, August 28

  • Women’s Day — $1 admission for women ages 13-59 (Children 12 and under are always free.)
  • Senior Citizens’ Day — Free admission for senior citizens (60+)

Thursday, August 29

  • Armed Forces Day — Free admission for active duty or veterans

Monday, September 2

  • Labor Day – Show your support of working women and men at the Fair’s Labor Day rally. Meet near Gate 4 at 10:00 am and join the march to Chevy Court at 10:30 am.
  • Summer Send Off “Dollar Day” – $1 adult admission all day

Note: ID required for free admissions listed above. For details, check out the complete schedule of Special Fair Days.

Payroll Deductions and Your NYSLRS Loan

If you take a loan against your NYSLRS contributions, you must repay the loan in five years. This timeframe is required by the Internal Revenue Service. If the loan is not repaid within five years, it defaults.

loan payroll deductions

NYSLRS loans are paid back through payroll deductions, which are taken out of your paycheck by your employer. During the five-year period, we’ll periodically review your remaining loan balance. If your current payroll deduction amount won’t be enough to pay off your loan within the required timeframe, we’ll notify your employer to increase your payroll deduction. We do this to make sure you can repay your loan on time.

Generally, the increase of your payroll deduction will be small. Your increase could be more significant if, for example, you go on leave without pay and need to make up any missed payments.

Once you pay your loan in full, we’ll notify your employer to stop taking payroll deductions.

How You Can Adjust Payroll Deductions

You can sign in to your Retirement Online account or call our automated phone line to check your outstanding loan balance. Knowing your outstanding loan balance can help you determine how to adjust your payroll deductions if you want to pay off your loan sooner. Please visit our website for more information about repaying your NYSLRS loan.

What Happens After You File
Your Retirement Application

The big day has finally come. You’ve submitted your retirement application, and you’re ready to start collecting your pension. Here’s what will happen next.

There are four documents we’ll need in addition to your retirement application. You can send them with your retirement application or after you apply:

retirement application

After we receive your application, we will send you a confirmation letter, which lists your retirement date and the forms we’ve received from you. If you don’t submit a W-4P, we’ll withhold federal taxes based on the status “married with three dependents.” (You can change your withholding at any time.)

If you haven’t received an estimate in the past 18 months, you don’t need to send an option election form with your retirement application. We’ll send you an estimate, along with an option election form, after we receive your retirement application.

Your First Payment

Your monthly payments will be based on the salary and service information we have on file.

We cannot send your first payment until we have proof of your date of birth. If you can, you should submit this document with your retirement application. (A copy of your New York driver’s license, birth certificate, passport or naturalization papers are acceptable proofs.) If you don’t have proof of date of birth available when you submit your retirement application, you can email us a photocopy by attaching it to our secure contact form.

We encourage you to sign up for direct deposit, so you’ll have safe and reliable access to your pension payments on the last business day of each month. Paper checks are mailed on the second to last business day of each month and may take longer to receive.

Possible Adjustments

If we receive additional payroll information from your employer, such as eligible lump sum payments, a retroactive pay increase or lagged regular earnings, we may need to adjust your pension payment. Because of the many variables that are often involved in verifying service and salary details with your former employer, finalizing your retirement benefit amount can take some time. The time this takes depends on the complexity of the circumstances. For example, if you worked for multiple public employers, it may take longer to pull together all your income information.

Once we have all the information we need, we’ll recalculate your pension amount. If your payment increases, you will receive a retroactive payment for the amount you are owed back to your date of retirement (the difference between your initial payments and your final retirement benefit amount).

For more information, please read our publication How Do I Prepare to Retire? and these recent blog posts:

NYSLRS – One Tier at a Time: PFRS Tier 2

Today’s post looks at Tier 2 in the Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS). A majority of PFRS members are in Tier 2, which began on July 31, 1973 and ended on June 30, 2009. Most Police and Fire Retirement System members are in “special” retirement plans that allow for retirement after 20 or 25 years, regardless of age, without penalty.

The special plans that cover municipal police officers and firefighters fall under Sections 384, 384(f), 384-d, and 384-e of Retirement and Social Security Law. As of March 31, 2018, there were 17,380 Tier 2 members in these plans; most of whom are covered by either Section 384-d (36.5 percent) or 384-e (62.8 percent).

Check out the graphic below for the basic retirement information for PFRS Tier 2 members.

*This graphic was updated on 6/28/19.

For more detailed information about your benefits, please review your retirement plan publication: Special 20- and 25-Year Plans for PFRS Tier 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 Members (Sections 384, 384-d and 384-e) (VO1517).

Stay tuned for more NYSLRS – One Tier at a Time posts. Next time, we’ll take a look at another one of our ERS tiers.

Five and Ten Year Pension Payment Options

NYSLRS pension payment options are designed to fit your needs after you retire. Understanding these options will make it easier for you to choose the one that’s right for you.

While the basic option, the Single Life Allowance, would provide you with a monthly payment for the rest of your life, all payments would end at your death. Other options, in exchange for a reduced benefit, allow you to provide for a spouse or other loved one after you’re gone.

Five and Ten Year Certain options don’t provide a lifetime benefit for a beneficiary, but they have advantages you may want to consider.

pension payment options

How These Pension Payment Options Work

The Five Year Certain or Ten Year Certain options provide you with a reduced monthly benefit for your lifetime. If you die within the five- or ten-year period after your retirement, your beneficiary would receive pension payments for the remainder of the five or ten years. If you live beyond the five- or ten-year period, your beneficiary would not receive a pension benefit upon your death.

Let’s say you choose the Five Year option. If you die two years after retiring, your beneficiary will receive a benefit for three years. If you choose the Ten Year option, and die after two years, your beneficiary will get a benefit for eight years. In either case, your beneficiary would receive the same amount you were receiving, though they would not be eligible for any COLA increases.

Another feature of these plans is that you can change the beneficiary at any time within the five- or ten-year period.

Whatever your situation, you should review the payment options and choose carefully. Visit our Payment Option Descriptions page for details about all available pension payment options. For a better idea of how these payment options would work out for you and your beneficiary, try our online Benefit Calculator.

Protecting Your Identity Online: Tips for Secure Passwords

Secure Passwords

The rules for password creation have changed in recent years, so you may have to unlearn some of the things you’ve been taught in the past about secure passwords.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the federal agency that created the original password guidelines, recently revised those guidelines. Its current recommendations are based on research on both the habits of users and the techniques of hackers. Here are some of their findings:

  • Length is a major factor in a password’s strength, so the longer the password, the better.
  • Complex passwords, with a mix of character types, are hard for people to remember, and do little to deter hackers.
  • Strong passwords can be created from short phrases that are easy for you to remember, but would be meaningless to anyone else.
  • Passwords may be used indefinitely as long as they’re strong and have not been compromised. Obviously, if you have an account with a company that just had a data breach, you’ll want to change that password.

Other Ideas on Secure Passwords

Changing passwords every 30, 60 or 90 days was recommended for thwarting hackers, but some security experts now question that tactic. Changing passwords on a regular schedule may have little security value and can lead to bad habits. Research has shown that people tend to make only minor changes when updating their passwords or create weak passwords that are easier for them to memorize. You’re better off creating a strong password, memorizing it and holding on to it.

While NIST has changed some of its guidelines, some of the old ones still apply. Don’t share your secure passwords with anyone, or leave them on sticky notes by your computer. Create unique passwords for important accounts, such as your bank account and your email, and avoid bad passwords such as “password,” “12345678,” “qwerty” and “iloveyou.”

Your Member Annual Statement is Coming

We’ve started distributing the 2019 Member Annual Statements (MAS) to more than 600,000 NYSLRS members. The process is done in stages over six to eight weeks. School employees receive their statements first; most others should see theirs by mid-July.

Your MAS contains important information about your NYSLRS membership, including your reported salary, service credit and beneficiaries. Depending upon your circumstances, you may also see projected annual benefits, loan balances or past service account balances.
member annual statement

When You Receive Your Statement

Be sure to review the information in your MAS carefully. If you need to update your beneficiaries or change your address, email or phone number, you can use Retirement Online — our convenient and secure self-service tool. You can contact us to correct most errors, but if you have a question about your reported salary, please ask your employer.

The information in your statement is valuable year-round; after you check it over, file your MAS away securely. It’s very likely you’ll reference it again in the future.

Member ID Cards

Your statement also includes a member identification card, with both your registration number and NYSLRS ID number. As we complete our series of computer upgrades, we will phase out the old registration numbers and keep just the NYSLRS IDs.

As identity theft becomes more and more prevalent, please help us protect you and your personal information. Reference either your registration or NYSLRS ID number — not your Social Security number — whenever you contact us.

When you receive your statement, be sure to clip out your ID card. Keep it in a secure but easily accessible place, so you’ll always have your numbers handy.

Questions about Your Statement?

Check out our interactive, online presentation that features answers to common MAS questions.

We can provide MAS reprints once we finish mailing statements — usually by mid-July. Contact us then, if you need to order a reprint.

Retirement Online is Back

Earlier this month, NYSLRS finished a series of computer system upgrades to improve the services available to our customers. Retirement Online was unavailable during the upgrade period, but it is now once again available to NYSLRS members, retirees and beneficiaries.

Retirement Online is Back

Using Retirement Online

Register and sign in to Retirement Online to:

  • View benefit information. You don’t need to rely on your annual statement or call our Contact Center. With Retirement Online, you can review up-to-date information about your account when it’s convenient for you.
  • Update contact information. Change your address, phone number or email address online instead of calling or emailing. If you submitted an address change form during the upgrade, we are processing those now.
  • View or update beneficiaries. It’s a good idea to keep your beneficiary designations up to date. View your selections and submit changes instantly. If you submitted a paper beneficiary designation form during the upgrade, your beneficiary change is effective as of the date we received it, however, updates may not appear in your Retirement Online account until your form is processed.
  • Apply for a loan. You may be eligible to take out a loan against your NYSLRS contributions. Do it safely and conveniently with Retirement Online. If you submitted a loan application during the upgrade, we are processing those now.
  • Generate an income verification letter. Sometimes a business or government agency requires you to verify your pension income. Generate and print an official income verification letter any time you need one.

As a result of this spring’s upgrades, we expect to roll out even more features later this year. Members will be able to estimate their pension benefit, purchase service credit and apply for retirement; retirees will get to manage their direct deposit information and more. Stay connected to NY Retirement News for details.

Membership in a Nutshell

If you’re a new NYSLRS member, or have been part of the Retirement System for years, you’re sure to have at least some questions about your NYSLRS benefits. What is vesting? Final average salary? Maybe you’re wondering what tier you’re in or why that even matters. Whether you’re a firefighter on Long Island or a State worker in Buffalo, you can find answers to many of your questions in Membership in a Nutshell. This publication is about the basics. It defines terms and explains concepts that are common to all NYSLRS retirement plans. Consider it essential reading.
Membership in a Nutshell

What’s Inside Membership in a Nutshell?

Membership in a Nutshell provides a brief description of the Retirement System, which comprises the Employees’ Retirement System (ERS) and the Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS). It also explains the Comptroller’s role as administrator of the System.

That’s followed by a list of some of the benefits provided to members, including:

  • Service Retirement Benefits (Pensions)
  • Disability Benefits
  • Death Benefits
  • Vesting of Benefits
  • Loans for Contributing Members

A larger section is dedicated to the details of membership, such as tier status, membership contributions, earning service credit and becoming vested.

Services We Offer

Perhaps the most helpful section describes Services We Offer Members. We want to provide you with the information you’ll need to plan for your retirement and make critical decisions about your future.

Retirement Online is a safe and convenient way to conduct business with NYSLRS, and to access benefit information such as your tier, retirement plan, service credit and beneficiaries. Register today if you don’t already have an account.

As you get closer to retirement, you can request an estimate of your pension from NYSLRS based on our records of your salary and years of service. We also offer one-on-one consultations with NYSLRS information representatives who can explain your benefits, answer your questions and help you feel confident about making your retirement decision.

Your Obligations

As a member, it’s important that you keep your information with NYSLRS up to date. This section discusses the different kinds of information, such as your mailing address and beneficiaries, that you should keep current. Much of this information can be updated using Retirement Online, or you can contact us.

More Information

There’s more information in this publication, but we’ll let you find it for yourself. We’ll also be featuring other publications in future blogs, including such favorites as:

Public Service Recognition Week

Public Service Recognition Week
This week we proudly celebrate the more than 600,000 members and 400,000 retirees of the New York State and Local Retirement System (NYSLRS) for their service to the people of New York State.

A Brief History of Public Service Recognition Week

Public Service Recognition Week was created in 1985 to honor the men and women who serve our nation as federal, state, county and local government employees. They dedicate their careers — and sometimes their lives — to keep others safe and provide for the common good. Their work makes life in our communities better.

This year, Public Service Recognition Week is being celebrated May 5 through May 11.

The Public Servants of NYSLRS

NYSLRS is full of stories about public servants finding value and meaning in the work they do, especially when they help other New Yorkers.

Whether they are protecting our communities, fighting fires, clearing our roads after snowstorms or simply helping government function better, NYSLRS members deliver the critical resources and services many New Yorkers depend on. Even outside of work, many NYSLRS members and retirees give back to our State by serving their communities as volunteers and supporters of charitable causes.

Comptroller DiNapoli’s Faith in Public Service

New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli is the administrator of NYSLRS and trustee of the Common Retirement Fund. His public service career began when he was elected as a trustee to the Mineola Board of Education at the age of 18, making him the first 18-year-old in New York State to hold public office. Comptroller DiNapoli is understandably proud about the career path he has chosen, and he often speaks about the contributions that New York’s public employees make, not just as engaged citizens, but as individuals who bring value to the communities where they live.