Monthly Archives: February 2017

Service Credit and Elected Officials

As public employees in New York State, elected and appointed officials are usually NYSLRS members. However, their compensation generally isn’t based on an hourly rate, and their irregular hours can make a typical timekeeping system impractical. So, how do we fairly and accurately credit their service in our system?

In 1975, Regulation 315.4  of the New York Codes, Rules and Regulations (NYCRR) established a process for reporting time worked by elected and appointed officials, which we’ve used since with periodic revision.

The Reporting Process

  1. Record of activities (ROA). For three full months, from the start of the term or appointment, the official tracks time spent on work-related activities. This includes things like answering constituent correspondence and phone calls; preparing for and attending board and committee meetings; and attending employer-sponsored forums. They must leave out time spent on call; attending campaign events, political rallies or private meetings; or socializing after board meetings. Officials have 150 days to submit an ROA to the secretary or clerk of the governing board. (Tier 1 members are not required to keep a ROA.)
  2. Reporting resolution. When the governing board receives the official’s ROA, it checks the ROA against the official duties of the position and excludes any improper entries. Based on this record, the board adopts a resolution establishing both the average number of days worked by the official each month and the length of a standard work day (SWD) for the official.
  3. Public notice. After passing the resolution, the governing board must post it on the board’s public website for at least 30 days or, if the board has no public website, on the official sign-board or at the main entrance to the clerk’s office. After 30 days, the governing board has 15 days to file the resolution with NYSLRS.
  4. Next term. An ROA can be valid for up to eight years, but if the official begins a new term or is reappointed before then, NYSLRS needs a new ROA and a new reporting resolution. An official, who feels that the previous ROA still accurately represents the time worked, can certify that in writing in lieu of a new ROA.

Governing boards must keep officials’ ROAs on file for at least 30 years. Any official who does not submit an ROA will receive a warning from NYSLRS. If that goes unheeded, member benefits, including estimates, tier reinstatements and requests for previous service credit will be suspended, and time worked during this period will be excluded from the individual’s pension benefit calculation.

Visit our website for the full details about reporting regulations for elected and appointed officials.

Federal Withholding and Your Pension

Federal Withholding and your Pension

Getting hit every year with a larger than expected federal tax bill? You may want to increase the federal withholding from your NYSLRS pension. Or maybe you’re getting a hefty tax refund every year. If you have too much withheld, you’re basically giving the government an interest-free loan. Maybe you need to adjust your withholding due to recent changes to the tax law for 2018 (if you’re not sure, you can check with your tax preparer, or you can use this Internal Revenue Service Withholding Calculator.)

But whatever your situation, you can adjust the amount we withhold from your retirement benefit at any time. Just follow these Step-By-Step instructions.

  1. Print our NYSLRS Form W-4P (Withholding Certificate for Pension or Annuity Payments) from our website. (This is a fillable form, so you can type in the information before you print it out.)
  2. Fill in the top of the form with your name, address, last four digits of your Social Security number and Registration number (if known).
  3. Complete one of the three numbered sections. (Do not complete more than one section.)
    • Complete Section 1 if you do not wish to have any federal income tax withheld.
    • Complete Section 2 if you want us to withhold based on current Internal Revenue Service (IRS) tax tables, your marital status and the number of federal exemptions you claim. To see how much that would be, use our tax withholding calculator. You can also have an additional amount withheld.
    • Complete Section 3 if you know how much you want withheld. Remember, the amount you should include here is the total amount you want withheld from your pension, not the amount you want to add or subtract from your current withholding.
  4. Print the completed form.
  5. Date and sign the form.
  6. Mail or fax your form to NYSLRS. Our address and fax number are at the top of the W-4P form.

Visit our website for other resources, including an interactive Understanding your W-4P Form tutorial, and more information about Taxes and Your Pension.

Are You Prepared for a Long Retirement?

Are you planning for a long retirement?We all look forward to a long, happy and financially secure retirement. But as you plan for retirement, “how long?” is an important question.

People are living longer. A 55-year-old man can expect to live another 25 years, to about 80. Women tend to live three or four years longer. But these are only averages. More than 36,000 current NYSLRS retirees are over 85, and more than 3,000 have passed the 95 mark. In fact, in the state fiscal year that ended in March 2016, 336 NYSLRS’ retirees were 101 or older. Considering that many public employees retire at 55, retirement could last 45 years or more.

As you plan for retirement, you need to ask yourself, will I have enough money to maintain a comfortable life for decades to come? Members of the Employees’ Retirement System (ERS) who retired in 2016 are receiving an average monthly pension of $2,364. The average Social Security benefit for a retired worker was $1,355, as of November 2016.

Retirement savings are also a crucial asset, but half of U.S. households with members aged 55 or older have no retirement savings, according to a recent report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office. If you have no retirement savings, it is never too late to start. An easy way to get started is through the New York State Deferred Compensation Plan, a retirement savings program created for New York State employees and employees of participating public agencies.